High Court rule that Article 50 cannot be invoked without it being debated by parliament

High Court rule that Article 50 cannot be invoked without it being debated by parliament

Charlie Chadwick: 14/11/2016

This means that Theresa May’s plans of a hard Brexit have suffered a harsh reality shock and that she will most likely have to revise her pledge to leave the European Union by March. There are mixed opinions across the country about this ruling and its implications with the ruling being castigated in general by the media. Theresa May has spoken out saying that she supports the freedom of the media to say what they want about issues such as this. The government are also appealing the ruling made by the High Court in the hope that it will be repealed and that we will be able to exit the EU without it being decided by parliament.

There is already a march scheduled for the 5th of December to protest against the ruling. Nigel Farage is due to lead the demo and has said that he expects there to be nearly 100,000 people to march from Trafalgar Square into the centre of London. Farage appears to be encouraging violence as he says there will be riots if Brexit is blocked, not the qualities you want in someone as influential as he has proved to be. All this seems to be Farage trying to prove a point to those who have been elected into power over him. As we saw with Brexit, he very quickly vacated his role as the leader of UKIP after campaigning so heavily to leave the EU. Personally I feel this was so that if it all went wrong, he wouldn't have to be the one to deal with the consequences. They don't seem hugely confident in this appeal as they are currently preparing a bill for the House of Commons to trigger Article 50. If they lose their appeal in the Supreme Court, then they will need to start gathering support for the bill in order to make sure that it passes. However, the real cause for concern is whether or not it would be debated in the House of Lords as this could lead to a reversal of the decision to leave. Unlike MPs, the Lords don’t represent constituents so are not as influenced by the popular opinion. I feel that if the House of Lords were to reverse this decision, the media backlash would almost be unbearable and the case against further reforming the House of Lords would be significantly strengthened. Since 1911 parties in power have been trying to gain support for their manifestos by saying that they will reform the House of Lords so they need to be wary of giving the public more of a reason to remove their part in the country’s democratic system.